Female Inner Genital

Piercing Aftercare Guide.
TL; DR – Too Much Information? For a shorter version try our quick reference guide here!

Healing

Your piercing should be healed after 6 weeks. The jewellery should not be removed during this time.

Piercings heal from the outside inwards, so they often feel healed long before they actually are. During the healing process a body piercing forms a very delicate type of tissue that can be easily damaged by moving the jewellery. It is a myth that jewellery will get stuck if you do not move it. Twisting or turning the jewellery can grind dirt or bacteria in to the wound, potentially causing irritation and infection (more information).


Cleaning Routine

  • The best thing to clean your piercing with to begin with is sterile saline.
    • This can be purchased from most pharmacies (drug stores) – you should look for products that are intended as eye rinses or first aid products.
    • You should try to ensure that your saline contains no antiseptic ingredients and is as pure as possible
    • The best kind of saline comes in single use pouches (like emergency eye rinse) or under pressure in a spray can. This is because the product remains sterile much more easily and isn’t exposed to bacteria which could harm your piercing.
  • Make sure your hands are thoroughly clean and then slowly pour the saline over your piercing.
    • Make sure to pour over both the front and the back of the piercing and use a fair amount – you want to really soak it.
    • If possible it is recommended to put your saline container into some hot water (not boiling – don’t melt your container) for a few minutes before use so that the saline is warm rather than cool. This helps maintain a good temperature for your healing cells to work at and helps loosen any crusties.
  • Clean thoroughly around the front and back of the piercing with a piece of sterile gauze soaked in the solution.
    • Sterile gauze can be found in the bandages sections of most pharmacies.
    • Crust or discharge on the jewellery in a light yellow or white colour are used up healing cells (not pus) and are normal to see throughout the healing time. Simply clean this away when it appears.
  • Dry the piercing thoroughly on a dry piece of sterile gauze and check the jewellery ends are on tightly.
    • Drying the piercing is important because moist wounds can attract bacteria
    • Towels, tissue and kitchen roll can harbour bacteria, dirt and dead skin so it is best to avoid them for this.
    • Turn the ball to the left to loosen or to the right to tighten.

Cleaning Information

It is best to clean your piercing twice a day for the next 10-12 days. After this, simply soak whenever the piercing feels sore or has crust on the jewellery and keep it clean in the shower.

In between soaks try to keep the piercing as dry as possible as over cleaning will only irritate the piercing and slow your healing process. It is perfectly fine to replace one of your daily cleans with a regular shower (baths should be avoided where possible).

It is important not to use any kind of alcohol or peroxide on the piercing. (Like hydrogen peroxide and rubbing alcohol). These products are too strong to use on piercings. They harm and weaken the healing tissue, complicating the healing time and increasing the risk of rejection.

Also avoid antibacterial, antimicrobial and antiseptic cleaners. (This in includes things like TCP, Bactine, Dial, Savlon and ‘piercing’ solutions containing Benzalkonium Chloride). They remove all the ‘good’ bacteria your body needs to heal with, repeatedly making your body restart the healing process.

You should also try to avoid using any kind of cream on the piercing. (This includes things like moisturiser, body lotion and foundation). This is because creams are petroleum based and cannot be absorbed by the body – meaning that it will form a seal and linger inside the piercing, trapping dirt and encouraging bacteria.


Additional Advice

Light bleeding.The piercing may be prone to light bleeding for the first couple of days. Usually this is just a few spots of blood but you may want to wear a pantyliner to protect any light coloured underwear. You should ensure that the piercing is clean and dry when a fresh liner is applied and that they are changed frequently (ideally each time you use the toilet). You may wish to bring a liner with you to the studio.

Bodily Processes. Urine actually leaves the body sterile so it poses no threat to the piercing. Different types of bacteria exist around the anus area, however, which can cause problems. This is why it is important to wipe from front to back when you use the toilet. It is also perfectly safe to menstruate during the healing process. Just take extra care to wash your hands before handling the area and try to wear tampons (or menstrual cups) rather than just liners or towels to lessen irritation and any bacterial contact. You may want to invest in a pack of sensitive baby wipes for use when you go to the toilet. It is likely to be better to shower twice daily with a gentle soap instead of soaking during this time.

Hair Removal. Hair removal should be done very carefully as broken skin near the piercing site could pose an infection risk. It would be best to avoid waxing but, as long as the piercing is treated carefully and kept free of contaminates, bikini line trimming with a razor shouldn’t harmful to the piercing.

Personal relations. During the first two weeks you should avoid exchanging body fluids (kissing and unprotected oral or penetrative sex). Other people have different bacteria on their skin, salvia and other fluids (even when they are clean) which can be harmful to you and cause infection. They can also carry viruses which can be transferred into an open wound like a piercing. You should take protected sex slowly and at your own pace; too much stimulation to the piercing during the first two weeks may cause soreness and disruption to the healing process. Ideally all sex toys should also be cleaned thoroughly with antibacterial soap and covered with a condom.

Irritation and swelling. Your piercing may get slightly swollen or irritated on and off during your healing time. After the first two weeks and initial healing phase chamomile may help with this as it is a natural anti-inflammatory and very soothing but won’t interfere with your healing. Chamomile tea is a cheap and easy way to find chamomile and is found in the fruit tea section of most supermarkets. Simply use the hot tea bag as a compress or soak your piercing in a bath of it. People who have a ragweed or celery allergy should do a skin test before using the tea.

Bathing with piercings. When you’re in the shower wash the piercing with a natural, gentle, soap. Preferably use perfume free, baby or sensitive soap to avoid any irritation. Soap helps to remove surface dirt and microbes which can cause infections.

Supporting healing. Take care of your general health. Drink plenty of water, sleep well, de-stress and eat properly. For the first few weeks try to avoid smoking, or drinking alcohol as they are immune system suppressants. Alcohol also thins the blood which can cause additional bleeding. Try taking a multivitamin that contains zinc, iron, vitamin A and vitamin C as these help to support your immune system and aid tissue repair. They may even reduce the chance of complications during healing.

Household environment. It is also important to keep areas that come into contact with your piercing as clean as possible so regularly changing your bedding and towels or using fresh underwear each time you clean the piercing will help to support your healing.

Swimming. The sea, lakes and pools contain a lot of bacteria which should be avoided for at least the first two weeks. Swimming pools have the added complication of being full of chemicals which can interfere with your healing process so you should soak after any contact with them during the rest of the healing process.